What Are You Saying?

How would our lives change if we regularly spoke positive truths into our hearts and minds instead of allowing ourselves to meditate on and talk about all that’s wrong with the world?.png

I have a confession to make—I talk to myself. Yes, it’s true. I regularly carry on conversations with myself. Most of the time, the discussions take place inside my head, but occasionally, the words spill out of my mouth. I guess it’s a good thing the only one to witness my crazy behavior is Barnabas.

I have a feeling, though, I’m not the only one talking to herself. Am I right? We all tend to run ideas around in our head and talk them through with ourselves. And that’s not a bad thing as long as the self-talk is positive.

Unfortunately, most of what I have to say to myself and about myself is negative. I complain about things. I berate myself for making a mistake or forgetting an important task. I bemoan my lack of discipline and criticize my valiant efforts.  I am my own worst enemy, and I often forget the power of words.

In Joel 3, the Scriptures describe a battle and a day of judgment. God is calling out all of those who have stood against Israel down through the ages and is issuing a challenge to them. He urges them to prepare for war, and notice what He says in verse 10:

Beat your plowshares into swords and your pruninghooks into spears: let the weak say, I am strong.
— Joel 3:10

The first half of the verse seems logical. If you’re preparing for war, one of the most important things you need to do is ready your weapons. That’s just common sense. But note the latter half of the verse: “Let the weak say, I am strong.” That, my friends, is positive self-talk, and God Himself recommended the armies use this tactic before going to war. For them, it would do little good because they were acting against God instead of with Him, but for us, this tactic could change our lives.

I’m not talking about being vain or arrogant. No, I’m suggesting we speak the truth as God sees it rather than our warped perception of life. Most days, I do well to get by physically, and I don’t praise myself for my strength because I don’t see strength. I see weakness. I feel pain. And I comment on these things. But I have forgotten that Philippians 4:13 tells me, I can do all things through Christ which strengtheneth me. With Christ working in and through me, I am strong.

Let the weak say, “I am strong.”

Let the ugly say, “I am fearfully and wonderfully made.”

Let the confused say, “The Lord directs my steps.”

Let the weary say, “The Lord is my refuge and my strength.”

Let the anxious say, “My times are in God’s hands.”

How would our lives change if we regularly spoke positive truths into our hearts and minds instead of allowing ourselves to meditate on and talk about all that’s wrong with the world? I dare say we would be happier, healthier, and more peaceful.

God’s battle plan for these soldiers involved preparing their weapons and preparing their hearts and minds for battle by strengthening their resolve with words. I wonder if that’s why military commanders often give motivational speeches before setting off to war. It makes sense. Friends, every day for the Christian is a battle. We are in a war against Satan, the powers of this world, and our flesh. God has provided us with our armor and weapons (Ephesians 6), and He’s even given us the guidebook for our positive self-talk. The Bible holds all the truth we will ever need.

I must stop putting myself down. I’m defeating myself in the battle before the enemy even has the chance to take a swing at me. With my negative thoughts and conversations, I’m setting myself up for failure and defeat. It’s time for me to remember that I hold the power of life and death, and that power resides in my tongue. May I use it wisely!

Death and life are in the power of the tongue: and they that love it shall eat the fruit thereof.
— Proverbs 18:21